Scosche’s Rhythm pulse monitor for iOS tracks your run, lets you change the beat (video)

Scosche's Rhythm pulse monitor for iOS tracks your run, lets you change the beat video

"Appcessories" is probably one of the more abrasive, yet devilishly descriptive, portmanteaus we've heard in recent years. But, if you're still not sure what it means, consider the Rhythm pulse monitor from Scosche a perfect example. The forearm-mounted device is a pulse / heart rate monitor with an iOS companion app. Working with some of your phone's inner smarts (like GPS), along with a dedicated accelerometer, the hardware / software combo logs vital data from your work out, which you can then share with the world, or enjoy broken down into detailed statistical analysis. If you've ever gone jogging with your iPhone, you'll know how fiddly it can be to change music tracks on the hop, so you'll be pleased to know the Rhythm covers that too. If this sounds like what your workout is missing, you can strap-up right away from any Apple or AT&T store (real or online) for $99, with other outlets, including Best-Buy stocking in time for Christmas.

Continue reading Scosche's Rhythm pulse monitor for iOS tracks your run, lets you change the beat (video)

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Scosche's Rhythm pulse monitor for iOS tracks your run, lets you change the beat (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 19 Sep 2012 01:40:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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The Zen of KickBeat

The Zen of KickBeat
Zen Studios is best known for its prowess in the pinball market, amassing its fame from titles such as Pinball FX, Zen Pinball and Marvel Pinball (Notice a trend?). This success has enabled Zen to expand its creative department and develop a wide range of games for varying platforms.

KickBeat, for example, is a music-based crossover action title for Vita that throws a brilliant twist into the tired rhythm genre. It combines the quick dexterity of classic rhythm games with a few of the industry's favorite tropes and trends: fighting and ninjas.

The most noticeable fad that Zen Studios doesn't integrate in KickBeat also happens to be the game's best feature: It has absolutely no touchscreen or rear touchpad functions.

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JoystiqThe Zen of KickBeat originally appeared on Joystiq on Thu, 16 Aug 2012 20:30:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Best class system in RPGs belongs to Wizardry VII

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This is a weekly column from freelancer Rowan Kaiser, which focuses on "Western" role-playing games: their stories, their histories, their mechanics, their insanity, and their inanity.
Best class system in RPGs belongs to Wizardry VII
One of the defining characteristics of the role-playing genre is its class systems. Although not every RPG has classes - Fallout or The Witcher, for example - some tend to be notable for their lack of classes. In some games, class is a single, permanent decision at the beginning of your adventure, and in others it's something that can be manipulated throughout. In most cases, though, it is the single most important aspect in determining how your characters interact with the game world. Thieves sneak and back stab, fighters charge in and absorb damage, snipers shoot from a distance.

The most impressive class system I've seen in an RPG is in 1992's Wizardry VII: Crusaders of the Dark Savant (as well as its less well-known predecessor, Bane Of The Cosmic Forge). What initially appears to be a straightforward, rigid D&D-style system is given massive depth by two things: the importance of racial base stats in determining class, and a dynamic system that allows for both massive improvement and possible disaster. It's possibly the most in-depth system I've seen in any RPG, and one that I wish was more well-known.

Continue reading Best class system in RPGs belongs to Wizardry VII

JoystiqBest class system in RPGs belongs to Wizardry VII originally appeared on Joystiq on Fri, 22 Jun 2012 21:15:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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XSEED announces rhythm/strategy title ‘Orgarhythm’ for Vita

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Move over Theatrhythm, there's a new absurdly titled and unpronounceable handheld rhythm game in town: Orgarhythm. Developed by Acquire (in association with Neilo) and set to be published in North America by XSEED sometime this year, Orgarhythm is a hybrid rhythm/strategy game for the Vita.

Acting as the God of Light, players do battle against the diametrically named God of Darkness by commanding armies of elementally-themed soldiers. The game's soundtrack, described as "a hypnotic mix of rock, club and tribal music," affects how and when your units attack, with the beat of the music acting as a quantifiable resource to be spent on stronger attacks. The music also dynamically alters itself depending on the circumstances of the battle, adding additional layers of complexity as more troops enter the fray.

As implied by the rather artsy trailer above, commanding your army is handled entirely by the Vita's touchscreen - tapping to select troops, swiping to direct them towards the desired target, etc. Said troops also have a Pokemon-esque relationship with the enemy, due to the fact that every unit is either an Earth, water or fire-type, with all the inferred weaknesses and strengths you'd expect from such a system.

Eventual DLC is mentioned by the press release tucked away after the break, but no specific plans are actually outlined. If you're an aspiring musician, however, take note: XSEED will be looking for independent artists sometime in the near future to bolstier Orgarhythm's aural catalog.

Continue reading XSEED announces rhythm/strategy title 'Orgarhythm' for Vita

JoystiqXSEED announces rhythm/strategy title 'Orgarhythm' for Vita originally appeared on Joystiq on Sat, 05 May 2012 16:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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BlackBerry phones could get rhythm-to-unlock, like dun-da-da-dun-dun

Who needs face unlock when you could just tap out a private ditty on your smartphone? Maybe you'd risk giving away your credentials to any vaguely rhythmic phone thief within ten feet, but RIM's engineers have a patent-approved answer to that: Rather than just sensing rhythm, they reckon a phone's accelerometer could also detect the magnitude and location of each tap, which would make it harder for eavesdroppers to mimic. Just don't pick something too syncopated -- not unless you're this guy.

Continue reading BlackBerry phones could get rhythm-to-unlock, like dun-da-da-dun-dun

BlackBerry phones could get rhythm-to-unlock, like dun-da-da-dun-dun originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 02 Mar 2012 07:29:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Krew Studios’ ‘Project Orb’ is as close to CUBE as we’re going to get

"It's coming. A game unlike anything you've ever seen. Prepare yourself ... for CUBE!"

The still nascent Krew Studios isn't doing much to distinguish itself from the developer of the fictional CUBE, if you ask us. This week, the studio announced intentions to create an Xbox 360 title for release this year, currently named "Project Orb," and frankly, we can't help but draw comparisons to the faux game trailer of yore.

For starters, we don't know a damn thing about Project Orb, other than some unbelievably ambiguous screens and a mention in the company's announce PR that the project "will indeed be a music title."

That's not exactly surprising, given the pedigree behind Krew Studios -- co-founder Michael Yum was an executive producer at PM Studios, whose last project was DJ Max Fever. Even more importantly, however, is the other half of that duo: famed music industry exec Clarence Avant.

"Clarence and I really wanted to start with something that could revolutionize the music industry as well as help rebuild a market that was considered sinking as of late 2010," Yum notes in the announcement. We'll get our first chance to see exactly what Yum means in the not so distant future it seems, as he also said that "further announcements will be made shortly." For now, gaze upon the orbs above and below ... if you dare.

Gallery: Project Orb

Continue reading Krew Studios' 'Project Orb' is as close to CUBE as we're going to get

JoystiqKrew Studios' 'Project Orb' is as close to CUBE as we're going to get originally appeared on Joystiq on Wed, 15 Feb 2012 17:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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The Rhythm Of The Quest in Fallout 3 and New Vegas

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This is a weekly column focusing on "Western" role-playing games: their stories, their histories, their mechanics, their insanity, and their inanity.

Have you ever been horribly frustrated by one part of a game, only to think of it as the best and most memorable section of that game in retrospect? It's the ruins of D.C. for me. I played Fallout 3 on the PC a year or so after release, so the first thing I did was load up on mods, introducing different play balance, graphics, more weapons, and most motivating of all, more music for Galaxy News Radio. But at the start of the game, GNR is in trouble and the station's signal is weak. So I went to fix it as soon as I could.

When I went into the ruins of D.C., I wasn't ready. By heading in that direction almost immediately, I skipped doing smaller-scale quests, which would have provided more experience and better equipment. D.C. was a slog. I scrambled for ammo, for health. I explored nooks and crannies that I didn't need to, because I hadn't even really figured out the game's compass yet. It was nail-bitingly tense, it was fresh, it was new, it took me hours. It was a pain, too. I died multiple times, but oh was it magnificent.

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JoystiqThe Rhythm Of The Quest in Fallout 3 and New Vegas originally appeared on Joystiq on Thu, 02 Feb 2012 20:15:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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