Help pick the best retro tech for our #ExpandThrowback contest

DNP Help pick the best retro tech for our #ExpandThrowback contest

We've received hundreds of thousands (of kilobytes) worth of submissions for our #ExpandThrowback contest and we want to thank those who valiantly opened up their closets, garages, attics, or just pivoted to the other side of their desk and snapped photos of their best in retro tech.

We've gathered as a team at Engadget HQ and winnowed the pickins' down to our top 20 favorites. Now it's time to turn the decision on who wins over to you.

Here's how it works. Click here to jump right to our contest page on Facebook. Peek through the pics and vote for your favorite. To keep it fair, we're only allowing one vote per Facebook account.

On September 20th, come back to see who won. What will the winners get?

  • First Prize Winner: All-expenses paid passage for you plus one to Engadget Expand in New York, including airfare, hotel room, transportation and food (ARV $3,000)*
  • (4) Second Prize Winners: We'll give you a $250 gift card so you can finally ditch that StarTAC and pick up a shiny new phone (they even have touchscreens now!).

Don't forget, if you're not already connected to all things Expand, stay tuned to our Expand hub for the latest news. Follow us on Twitter, Facebook and Google+.

*Prizes mentioned in this article are bound by the official rules of the contest.

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PaperDude VR resurrects Paperboy with Oculus Rift, Kinect, KickR and a bike

DNP OCulus Rift's Paperman gives all the fun of Paperboy but with a sweat

One sad aspect of modern tech is that it's all but ruined our dreams of slinging dead trees for comic book money after school. However, gizmos have enabled a killer sequel to the best paperboy simulation ever. Using a smattering of electronics -- and a real bike! -- PaperDude VR is the followup we never knew we wanted. Joining an Oculus Rift VR headset, Microsoft Kinect and Wahoo Fitness KickR into a sweat-drenched union, PaperDude VR creates an almost zen-like experience of tossing newspapers, knocking down road barriers and busting windows.

Nostalgia's a powerful drug, and we'd love a ride to see if chasing the dragon of our youth is as good as we remember. Given developer Globacore's history though, the chances of seeing this outside a specialized kiosk are slim to none. Regardless, we have one niggling question: Do pixelated paperdudes dream of 8-bit dogs?

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Source: Weird Science

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X-Arcade’s rugged Solo Joystick: supports PC, Mac, Linux and nine gaming consoles

XArcade's rugged Solo Joystick supports PC, Mac, Linux and nine gaming consoles

There's multifaceted, and then there's X-Arcade's Solo Joystick. Following up on the outfit's aptly-titled Dual Joystick, the Solo here is a 12-pound beast that's built to withstand just about anything. And, indeed, function just about anywhere. Up for pre-order now, the gamepad is set to ship to gamers everywhere on December 1st, bringing with it 11-inches of arcade-style glory. It'll function with PC, Mac and Linux rigs right out of the box for $99.99, while optional adapters enable support for nine different gaming consoles (PlayStation 1 / 2 / 3, Wii, Dreamcast, GameCube, Xbox, Xbox 360 and Wii U). Oh, and since you're wondering, they company claims that it's "hard at work on new adapters for the upcoming Xbox One and PS4," and it's throwing in a fully licensed version of Maximus Arcade Software for anyone who places an order before September 1st.

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Via: HotHardware

Source: X-Gaming

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Lomography reinvents Petzval lens for analog and digital SLRs

Lomography reinvents Petzval lens for analog and digital SLRs

When it was invented in 1840, the Petzval lens revolutionized photography thanks to its f/3.6 aperture. It's legendary for producing images with super sharp centers and unique backgrounds with a whirly bokeh -- as such it's particularly well suited for shooting portraits. Most Petzval lenses today are defective because of age and not optimized for modern cameras, so Lomography set out to reinvent the lens for the 21st century. The company just launched a Kickstarter campaign to bring the Petzval lens back for $300 -- it's teaming up with Zenit to manufacture high-quality lenses for analog and digital SLRs with Nikon F and Canon EF mounts. Lomography's Petzval lens is made of brass, features a gear rack focusing mechanism and comes with a Waterhouse aperture set (f/2.2, f/4, f/5.6, f/8, f/11 and f/16). Are you as intrigued as we are? Follow the source link below for the full campaign details.

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Source: Lomography (Kickstarter)

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iam8bit Entertainment System retro gaming console / art project to debut during E3

iam8bit Entertainment System to debut during E3,

The iam8bit collective has presented intersections of art and old-school gaming frequently over the last few years, and at an LA event during E3 this hand-built console will join the show. Designed "specifically with retro gaming in mind" and put together by artist Travis Chen, the iam8bit Entertainment System's hardware specs will be revealed at its public launch Friday night. The systems will be made available for purchase both in person and online, although price is still TBA just like the heavyweights from Microsoft and Sony. Is the promise of a retro gaming PC featuring some classic wood paneling not enough to draw you in? The exhibition also features work from more than 80 artists plus a real-life replica of Uncle Scrooge McDuck's money bin to celebrate Ducktales: Remastered. It's scheduled to run until June 30th, take a look after the break for the location and time.

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Source: iam8bit

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All-in-one Atari 2600 controller crafted to curtail retro gaming clutter

Allinone Atari controller finally arrives to curtail retro gaming clutter

Ahhh, the venerable Atari 2600. The godfather of console gaming has, in recent years, seen a resurgence as a hacker's muse -- mods to its innards and controllers are legion on the web. Recently, a new mod emerged: a controller that combines the capabilities of the Atari's joystick, paddle and keyboard controllers. It's crafted from a small wooden box, a cannibalized joystick, an Ethernet cable, some switches and a smattering of other electronic bits, and there's a full how-to on making one of your own on Instructables, courtesy of user x2Jiggy. If the mere mention of such an all-in-one has those DIY juices flowing, head on past the break for a construction video and see how it's done. It's high time you dust off your stock 2600 and break out Pitfall, Adventure or, well, Breakout.

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Via: Hack a day

Source: Instructables

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This is the Modem World: Nothing is new. It’s been done before.

Each week Joshua Fruhlinger contributes This is the Modem World, a column dedicated to exploring the culture of consumer technology.

DNP This is the Modem World Nothing is new It's been done before

It's funny how things come back around. When I was growing up in the '80s, music was looking back at the '50s and '60s and re-creating it into some of the best bands the world has seen. Paul Weller wouldn't have become the songwriter he is had he not grown up on the Beatles. Likewise, Paul McCartney wouldn't have become the genius that he is had he not been raised on Little Richard. And now, bands are looking back at the '80s and re-doing that explosive era -- with both good and bad results that I will not go into here lest I make new enemies.

Culture is cyclical, and we're beginning to see that technology is bound to follow that same rinse-and-repeat formula.

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Ericsson T28z review

Ericsson T28z review

When Ericsson launched the T28 in 1999, it was the lightest and slimmest phone on the market. It was also the first handset ever to use a lithium polymer battery. The T28 was a premium device -- Ericsson described it as "designer technology", and it was successful with business executives before the Blackberry became popular. Unlike its bar-shaped competitors, the T28 was immediately recognizable by its signature antenna stub and "active flip" keypad cover. Ericsson packed the phone with state-of-the-art features like voice dialing and an optional Bluetooth dongle. It came in three versions: T28s (GSM 1800 / 900), T28z (GSM 1900) and T28 World (GSM 1900/900). Our T28z review unit started life on VoiceStream (eventually acquired by T-Mobile). How does this classic handset stack up to our modern pocketable computers? Find out after the break.

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This is the Modem World: Why we go retro

Each week Joshua Fruhlinger contributes This is the Modem World, a column dedicated to exploring the culture of consumer technology.

DNP This is the Modem World Why we go retro

So I was listening to Howard Stern on my way home from work the other night. Satellite radio came with my car and, whether you like him or not, Stern's a pretty good companion in LA traffic. I happen to like him. Anyway.

"You know Gary," he prodded, "I'm gonna use a horse and buggy instead of a car, just because it's cool."

Turns out he was giving Producer Gary Dell'Abate a hard time about his love for vinyl. Gary did his best to defend the hobby, saying it has been scientifically proven that analog sounds better than digital, that it's just something people do for fun and that it's a really interesting subculture.

Of course, he didn't win.

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