Latest Surface Pro accessory rumor points to a desktop dock

DNP Desktop dock rumors swirl for Microsoft's Surface Pro tablets

Microsoft is supposedly working on a desktop docking station that's compatible exclusively with Surface Pro and Surface Pro 2 slates (following yesterday's rumor of a battery packing keyboard cover), according to reports from Neowin and WinSuperSite. So what could the Docking Station bring the Pro and its (still unannounced) sequel? Possibly, USB 2.0 and 3.0 ports as well as gigabit Ethernet and audio in / outs. Even if your typical workflow requires multiple monitors, Redmond has you covered thanks to an external video output. These are box-standard features on any recent PC, sure, but they could help fix the issues we had with the Pro's basic usability. We don't have price or availability info, but there's likely an announcement coming soon -- we are over a year out from the Windows 8 tab's reveal, after all.

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Via: WinSuperSite

Source: Neowin

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Eye Tribe starts taking pre-orders for $99 Windows eye tracker

DNP Eye Tribe affordable eye tracker

Leap Motion, Kinect or MYO could satisfy your yearning for motion control, but an itch for eye-tracking tech might be harder to scratch. There aren't a lot of them on the market yet, which Eye Tribe hopes to change now that it's opened pre-orders for the developer edition of its Windows peripheral. Similar to the Tobii REX, the Eye Tribe Tracker is a thin bar that plugs into a PC or a tablet via USB and follows your line of sight, except its $99 price is a bit more palatable. Since the firm's hoping developers will integrate eye control to existing games and software for the benefit of future buyers, the first version of the device will come with an SDK. Eye Tribe's yet to lay out plans for the Android version showcased in April -- the video after the cut also hints at iOS and OS X integration -- but it has promised to ship the Windows eye tracker before the year ends.

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Source: Eye Tribe

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Binatone’s Brick phone was acceptable in the ’80s (hands-on)

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"If you're an '80s guy like me, then you know it's important to be a shark. That means getting up, choking down a double espresso and listening to Huey Lewis. Then it's time to hit the trading floor and make a cool hundred mil or something before dinner. Lunch? Lunch is for wimps. Talking about wimps, those hipsters who use Native Union's Pop retro smartphone handset are scum. Me? I'm all about the Binatone Brick. Cram in a SIM card and you can make calls on this thing AND play Snake (I mean, we are living in the future) even while riding the elevator. But pair it over Bluetooth to your smartphone, and you'll impress everyone when you're walking and talking. It'll launch soon for you mere mortals, priced at £50 in the UK with a 1,000mAh battery, but for a big-shot like me who's always making deals, I'm holding out for the 2,000mAh version that'll come later for £80. Oh, and one more thing -- in the time it took you to read this, I just bought San Marino."

-G. Gekko

Mr. Gekko's views are entirely his own and do not reflect those of Engadget or AOL.

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Follow all of our IFA 2013 coverage by heading to our event hub!

Dana Wollman learned during this report that greed, for want of a better word, is good.

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Source: Binatone

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16 ways to play: SmartGlass support for Xbox One doubles the controller cap

With the new Xbox this November, Microsoft's bringing a new iteration of SmartGlass to iOS, Android, and Windows Phone devices. And with said new iteration comes promised SmartGlass ubiquity. Microsoft GM and SmartGlass team lead Ron Pessner told Engadget as much in an interview this week on all things SmartGlass for Xbox One. You'll need to download a new (still free) SmartGlass app to your Smart device of choice come launch day (the new app won't function with Xbox 360, just the One).

Up to 15 of your best friends can bring their Smart devices over and...well, nothing just yet, but the Xbox One will support 16 Smart devices connected at one time (double the connected controller cap). Just imagine the possibilities for virtual canasta! Okay, not so thrilling, but the potential for games like Monopoly or Dungeons & Dragons is evident. Or maybe something more like Spaceteam?

Pessner also promised that the connectivity between Smart device and console is "three-and-a-half times faster" on Xbox One than with 360 (depending on your home wireless setup), and the first time "only takes about four seconds." And while on the go, the SmartGlass app can be used for mobile shopping, allowing a game or other piece of content to be purchased and made available when you get home. Pessner wouldn't go into specifics, but he told us, "We definitely want to make sure it's a seamless process for customers and they're able to find a piece of content regardless of where they are -- the web or the SmartGlass app -- and being able to have that content ready for them to play when they return to their Xbox One." The remotely queued content will show up as pinned to your Dashboard when you get back to the console, available to play immediately.

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3Doodler 3D printing pen’s shipping model hits IFA, we go hands-on

3Doodler 3D printing pen's shipping model hits IFA, we go handson

Remember the 3Doodler? Odds are plenty of you do, seeing as how the company managed to nab a staggering $2.3 million for its $30,000 Kickstarter campaign. For the minority of you who didn't participate, here's a quick refresher: the device is a 3D printing pen. It's a bit like a hot glue gun for plastic -- simple and ingenuous, it melts a single strand of ABS or PLA, allowing you to draw objects in the air, solidifying as you draw up.

The pen was still in early prototype phase when we first saw it, and now, here at IFA its co-creator Max Bogue is showing off the final shipping product (seeing as how Kickstarter funders will be getting theirs later this year). This 3Doodler actually looks pretty similar to that early unit. All the same elements are in place: a slot in the rear to feed in the plastic, the heated tip where it comes out in semi-liquid form, an exhaust fan (which is pretty loud, but should quiet down before people start to get theirs) and two buttons for fast and slow extrusion.%Gallery-slideshow81791%

Follow all of our IFA 2013 coverage by heading to our event hub!

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Nine Inch Nails puts Kinect, various other gadgets to use on festival tour

Nine Inch Nails puts Kinect, various other gadgets to use on festival tour

It's no secret that Nine Inch Nails' frontman Trent Reznor likes to do things a bit differently. He and long-time art director Rob Sheridan have assembled a crew to make the group's festival dates this year as visually stunning as the audio promises to be. Along with a slew of other high-tech gadgetry, there's a Kinect that handles motion tracking with captured movements projected onto a handful of mobile video screens. Alongside thermal and regular ol' video cameras, live video content is piped on-stage during specific parts of the set -- with a hand from the folks at Moment Factory, a multimedia environment studio. Reznor also notes that much of the system is "a bunch of homemade software and hardware effects that they've tied together" with the goal of creating a film-like quality to an hour and a half performance. For a 13-minute, behind the scenes look at the prep work, head on past the break.

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Source: Nine Inch Nails (Tumblr)

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Engadget’s back to school guide 2013: docks

Welcome to Engadget's back to school guide! Today we're talking docks. Head to the back to school hub to see the rest of the product guides as they're added throughout the month. Be sure to keep checking back; in early September, we'll be giving away a ton of gear, including some of the picks in our guides.

DNP Engadget's back to school guide 2013 docks

Plug and play... and then party in your dorm. That's how the kids do it nowadays, with their iPods, iPhones and Android devices connected to virtual libraries of stored and streaming music. But unless you're rocking an HTC One with BoomSound, the dinky speakers on your daily driver just aren't going to adequately pump out the late-summer jams. For those at-home boogie breakdowns, you're going to need some serious hardware. And lucky you, we're here to sort through the clutter and highlight the best back to school picks for any budget.

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Samsung’s cranking out DDR4 memory for faster, more efficient servers (updated)

Samsung's cranking out 4GB DDR4 memory chips for faster, more efficient servers

DDR4 memory is finally in mass production, as Samsung Semiconductor announced it's churning out 4GB 4Gb (512MB) modules, based on "20nm-class" process technology. 32GB sticks like the ones shown above are headed for the premium server market, where Samsung claims their higher speeds (up to 2,667 Mb/s) make for higher performance and 30 percent less power consumption than DDR3. The company claims this is the world's smallest and highest performing 4Gb RAM chip, and we expect it won't stop there -- when Samsung showcased the technology in 2011 it claimed speeds could eventually reach as high as 4Gbps.

Update: It's four gigabits, not gigabytes -- thanks for the corrections, everyone.

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MakerBot Digitizer pre-orders open, shipping mid-October for $1,400

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MakerBot tipped off some of its loyal fans last week by way of newsletter, but now the Digitzer's arrival is officially officially. The next piece of the Brooklyn company's ever-expanding 3D printing ecosystem has been revealed piece by piece since debuting back at SXSW, and now it's finally ready to make its way to maker hands. Well, in a few months, at least. Pre-orders for the spinning 3D scanner are open now -- plunk down $1,400 (plus $150 for the MakerCare support program, if you're so inclined), and one of these bad boys can be yours in mid-October. The device captures 3D images from objects up to eight-inches tall with help from two lasers and a camera, a system the company has, naturally, optimized for its own Replicator printers and Thingiverse 3D object catalog. There's a press release below for those seeking more info.

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Source: MakerBot

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