TI intros DLP pico projector chipset based on its Tilt & Roll Pixel technology

TI launches DLP pico projector chipset based on its Tilt & Roll architecture

TI's DLP unit promised us brighter, sharper pico projectors when it unveiled its Tilt & Roll Pixel architecture at CES, and it now has the TRP-based silicon to make those projectors possible. The company's new DLP Pico 0.2" TRP chipset produces images with up to twice the brightness and resolution of its ancestor, even while it uses as little as half the power. The company hasn't named hardware partners, but it notes that companies are already building products with the chip; it may not be long before we see the next generation of projector-equipped smartphones and tablets.

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Source: Texas Instruments

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Houston Texans’ new HD scoreboard is even wider than the Cowboys’

Everyone at the August 17th NFL preseason game in Houston's Reliant Stadium will be treated to humongous images of sweaty athletes, thanks to the venue's monstrous scoreboard. According to Reliant's officials, the new HD monitor isn't just any enormous display, butah the widest one in professional sports. We're talking about several connected boards measuring 277.17 x 52.49 feet as a whole, with each display covering 14,549 square feet and boasting a 5.28 million pixel resolution. That's more than 100 feet wider than Dallas Cowboy's LED setup, enough for Reliant to usurp its throne as the widest screen in football, and largest in Texas. Due to the scoreboard's gigantesque real estate, it can show not only side-by-side live feeds and replays, but also statistics and advertisements during a game. Unfortunately for the folks at Houston, the stadium can only hold the record for a year. Jacksonville's Everbank Field will debut an even longer 301 x 55 feet scoreboard in 2014, and Charlotte Motor Speedway still holds the overall sports record with its 200 x 80 foot screen.

[Image credit: Houston Texans, Twitter]

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Via: Houston Texans

Source: Houston Chronicle

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Some 2013 Nexus 7 users report buggy multitouch, Google is investigating

Some 2013 Nexus 7 users report buggy multitouch, Google is investigating

A muddled sense of direction isn't the only problem affecting the new generation of Nexus 7 slates, it seems, as some users are also reporting issues with multitouch on the 1,920 x 1,200 display. The clip below the fold demonstrates the bug, and shows the touchscreen registering phantom inputs before freaking out for a couple of seconds. Over the past few weeks, chatter on the XDA Developers and Google Product forums suggests it's fairly common, with a response from Google on the latter stating: "The Android team is aware of this issue and investigating." We haven't had the same troubles with a 2013 Nexus 7 in our possession (running Android 4.3 build JSS15J, FYI), and while the root of the problem is still up for discussion, let's hope funky software is to blame -- no one wants the hassle of replacing faulty hardware, especially Google, when an OTA fix will do.

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Via: GSMArena, Android Police

Source: Google Product Forums, XDA Developers (1), (2)

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ASUS’ 31.5-inch PQ321 4K monitor gets reviewed: pricey, but luscious

ASUS' 315inch PQ321 4K monitor gets reviewed pricey, but luscious

Let's be honest: almost no one expected one of the world's first 4K monitors to be ho hum. After all, it has eleventy gazillion pixels. Er, a native 3,840 x 2,160 resolution, but close enough. The gurus over at HotHardware were able to take the 31.5-inch PQ321 for a spin, and predictably, they loved what they saw. Outside of being duly impressed with how the panel handled everything from Photoshop work to gaming, they were also taken aback by the monitor's svelte frame. In fact, they found it a little tough to look back on a 1080p screen after a couple of weeks with this thing -- it's like the SD-to-HD revolution all over again. That said, they did confess that the product feels a bit ahead of its time, and the monstrous $3,500 price tag is certainly indicative of that. Feel free to hit the source link for the full spiel, but the long and short of it is this: if you're in the one percent, buy it.

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Source: HotHardware

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LG’s OLED display production plant is taking shape, will fire up second half 2014

LG's OLED display mass production plant is taking shape, will fire up second half 2014

To us, installing some factory equipment doesn't seem like much cause for celebration. To LG, however, it's the first piece of tangible progress made towards getting its new OLED manufacturing line up and running. At a shindig held to welcome the equipment to LG's plant, the company said it expects to begin mass production of panels for 50-inch plus HDTVs in the second half of next year -- a little later than the original plan of first half 2014. Hopefully there won't be any more delays, as we'd quite like to see the production line flowing and the mammoth prices of those gorgeous curved sets come down a little.

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Via: OLED-Info

Source: The Korea Times

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Google taps film students with Glass Creative Collective

Google taps film students with Glass Creative Collective

Glass hasn't exactly been revered for its brilliant image quality, but that's not stopping Google from making a push among budding filmmakers. The Glass Creative Collective, a partnership with film and design schools, is intended to familiarize students at a handful of institutions with the video-capture wearable. Several colleges, including the Rhode Island School of Design, UCLA and the University of Southern California are on board -- students will reportedly begin exploring the device as a filmmaking tool beginning this fall. Glass could be a fit for documentary filmmaking, and for capturing point-of-view footage, of course, but performance limitations would likely prevent it from taking on a starring role in any production. We're a bit skeptical that the Creative Collective will be a booming success, but Google's promised to circle back with results once the program gets off the ground.

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Via: CNET

Source: Google Glass (Google+)

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SIGGRAPH 2013 wrap-up

SIGGRAPH 2013 wrapup

As we noted at the the end of the show last year, SIGGRAPH certainly delivers on the eye candy. From graphics demos to display tech and both 3D printing and motion capture, this is one trade show that offers a glimpse into the present and future of the industry when it comes to visual goods. Highlights include major component news from NVIDIA and Samsung while Dell's 32-inch 4K display and the latest Disney Research project certainly nabbed our attention. The show ends today until we descend upon Vancouver next summer, but a gallery chock full of sights from the show floor and a roundup of the past few days should tide you over until then.

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NVIDIA Research’s near-eye light field display prototype eyes-on (video)

NVIDIA Research's neareye light field display prototype eyeson video

A quick stroll through the Emerging Technologies section of SIGGRAPH usually reveals a collection of university projects and the latest Disney Research endeavor. However, we don't usually see the likes of NVIDIA amongst the fold there. This time around, though, the component maker is showing off an undertaking from its Research sector: near-eye light field displays. To show the project off, a pair of OLED mircodisplays were installed on a glasses-like frame with a box for the electronics stashed up top. Those Sony ECX332A panels measure 15.36 x 8.64mm wield a resolution of 1,280 x 720 through 24-hit color pixels (which equates to a smidge over 83 pixels per millimeter). The diminutive displays open up the door for thinner and lighter head-mounted units that can sort "accurate accommodation, convergence and binocular-disparity cues."

The light field that's constructed directly over the pupil allows the viewer to focus at multiple depths and create a field of view of about 70 degrees. Both of those aspects were quite apparent to our peepers upon getting locked in for a quick demo. Despite being situated so close to the eye, the unit still provides some sharp images that we witnessed first hand. Of course, the close proximity causes some pixel loss at the hands of a decreased spacial resolution. One pretty neat aspect to this whole system is that software tweaks can be made to account for someone's glasses or contacts prescription -- software that's powered by NVIDIA GPUs and OpenGL, of course. Without having to modify the hardware, changes to the microdisplays are sorted sans the need to switch to another set or make physical adjustments. For a bit more explanation of the unit, check out the video that resides just past the break and full findings that were presented here in Anaheim at the coverage link that follows.

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Canon previews a handheld version of its MREAL Mixed Reality tech at SIGGRAPH, we go hands-on (video)

Canon previews a handheld version of its MREAL mixed reality tech at SIGGRAPH, we go handson video

As a complement to its MREAL Mixed Reality headset, Canon is showing off a handheld version of the technology this week at SIGGRAPH. The new version functions much like the head-mounted one, enabling the use of markers or (as was the case here) sensors to render images in real space. Something you'll want to keep in mind: this is still an enterprised-focused device. That said, it doesn't make the tech demo and usage scenarios any less cool to gawk at. The demonstration we saw here in Anaheim involved a Kabuki dancer out in the center of the demo area. Details like shadows and wrinkles in the performer's clothes were rendered in real time -- just as if a real person were performing. A collection of sensors mounted around the top of the demo stage allowed us to look around the space while the projected image reacted to our position. Not once did we lose sight of the action.

Two other demos for the head-mounted display (that can easily translate to the handheld unit as well) caught our attention, too. First, a boat motor was projected in real space using augmented reality markers, allowing the user to inspect a scale model of the engine for training or other purposes. The ability to deconstruct the engine and see how different portions of it worked was all available to the user. Next, we saw a set of markers wrapping a rectangle projected a model of a Canon DSLR housing. Both of these scenarios offer a more in-depth look at 3D models before the prototyping phase or any steps are taken towards production. A quick look at the Kabuki demo and our best in-dance commentary awaits on the other side of the break.

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